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Dead Terrorists Tell No Tales

Posted on February 09, 2010 by Marc Thiessen

The CIA reportedly succeeded in killing the head of the Pakistani Taliban -- the most recent in a flurry of drone attacks the agency has launched in South Asia and the Middle East. Another strike in Pakistan reportedly took out one of the FBI's most wanted terrorists; another in Pakistan took out a master bomb-maker for the al Qaeda affiliate in the Philippines, Abu Sayyaf; and a strike in Yemen targeted a senior military leader of al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, the group behind the Christmas Day attack (his fate has yet to be determined).

President Barack Obama's escalation of drone strikes is one area in the counterterrorism fight where he has earned plaudits from even his most vocal critics on the right. Hold the applause. Obama's escalation of the "Predator War" comes at the very same time he has eliminated the CIA's capability to capture senior terrorist leaders alive and interrogate them for information on new attacks. The Predator has become for President Obama what the cruise missile was to President Bill Clinton -- an easy way to appear like he is taking tough action against terrorists, when he is really shying away from the hard decisions needed to protect the United States.

To be sure, unmanned drones are critical in the struggle against al Qaeda. They allow the United States to reach terrorists hiding in remote regions where it would be difficult for special operations forces to reach them, or to act on perishable intelligence when the only choice is to kill a terrorist or lose him. Constantly hovering Predator (or Reaper) drones also have a psychological effect on the enemy, forcing al Qaeda leaders to live in fear and spend time focusing on self-preservation that would otherwise be used planning the next attack. All this is for the good.

The problem is that Obama is increasingly using drone strikes as a substitute for operations to bring terrorist leaders in alive for questioning -- and that is putting the country at risk. As one high-ranking CIA official explained to me, in an interview for my book Courting Disaster, "In the wake of 9/11, [the CIA] put forward a program that had a lethal component to strike back at the people who did this. But the other component was to prevent this kind of catastrophe from happening again. And for that, killing people -- especially killing senior al Qaeda leaders -- is potentially counterproductive in that we can't know or learn of future attacks. You can't kill them all, and you don't want to kill them all from an intelligence standpoint. We needed to know what they knew."

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What They're Saying

An important book Rquotest
Senator John Cornyn
Absolutely superb! Rquotest
Former Attorney General Michael Mukasey
One of the most important books of the year. Courting Disaster is a must-must-read. Rquotest
Michelle Malkin (michellemalkin.com)
A terrific and important book Rquotest
Debra Burlingame, (sister of AA Flight 77 pilot Charles Burlingame)
[Thiessen is] the most forceful, serious and articulate new spokesman for hardliners around – one who can back up his opinions with facts that can influence the debate. Rquotest
William Safire
In Courting Disaster, Marc Thiessen sets the record straight. Rquotest
Donald Rumsfeld
You Must Read Courting Disaster. Rquotest
Former CIA Director Mike Hayden
If you want to know what really happened … at the CIA interrogation sites or at Guantanamo Bay, you simply must read this book Rquotest
Dick Cheney

Twitter

RT @JedediahBila: Lamb has as much trouble using the word "terrorists" as Obama does. rquo
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RT @michellemalkin: MT @dangerroom: State Department: We Monitored Libya Attack 'In Almost Real-Time' (So why'd they blame protesters?) ... rquo
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RT @RedState: Donald Rumsfeld: Obama’s Handling Of Libya “Embarrassing” http://t.co/Vtbkf26e #TCOT #RS rquo
Posted on Twitter over 4 years ago

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